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Indigenous tribes grapple with wildfires and deforestation in the Amazon

Kayapo indigenous men stand on tree logs they say they were left by loggers who fled as they where doing a surveillance patrol three weeks ago in Bau indigenous land in Amazon near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 13, 2019. In August, Brazil\u0027s space research agency, INPE, revealed the number of fires in the Amazon this year was the highest since 2010. And deforestation rose for the fourth straight month in August from a year earlier, it said. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Kayapo indigenous men stand on tree logs they say they were left by loggers who fled as they where doing a surveillance patrol three weeks ago in Bau indigenous land in Amazon near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 13, 2019. In August, Brazil's space research agency, INPE, revealed the number of fires in the Amazon this year was the highest since 2010. And deforestation rose for the fourth straight month in August from a year earlier, it said. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A Kayapo indigenous man looks at a tree stump, where loggers invaded and deforested the forest on Bau indigenous land, in the Amazon near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 13, 2019. Brazil\u0027s conservation efforts have come under scrutiny this year amid the worst fires in the Amazon rainforest since 2010. Far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has called for rolling back conservation rules to allow more development of the region\u0027s natural resources. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A Kayapo indigenous man looks at a tree stump, where loggers invaded and deforested the forest on Bau indigenous land, in the Amazon near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 13, 2019. Brazil's conservation efforts have come under scrutiny this year amid the worst fires in the Amazon rainforest since 2010. Far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has called for rolling back conservation rules to allow more development of the region's natural resources. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A Kayapo indigenous man pushes a boat during a surveillance patrol made around Bau indigenous lands in the Amazon, to protect it from loggers and land grabbers near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 12, 2019. As a far-right Congressman and presidential candidate, Bolsonaro drew headlines for his disparaging comments regarding Indian tribes, and as president he has said that too much of the country\u0027s territory is unproductive because indigenous tribes have special rights.  REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A Kayapo indigenous man pushes a boat during a surveillance patrol made around Bau indigenous lands in the Amazon, to protect it from loggers and land grabbers near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 12, 2019. As a far-right Congressman and presidential candidate, Bolsonaro drew headlines for his disparaging comments regarding Indian tribes, and as president he has said that too much of the country's territory is unproductive because indigenous tribes have special rights. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Kayapo indigenous men stand on a tree log and a tree stump left by loggers who fled when they where doing a surveillance patrol three weeks ago on their land in the Amazon near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 13, 2019. Some 60% of the forest is located in Brazil, the biggest share of the world\u0027s largest rainforest. The Amazon is also home to around 1 million people who are members of 500 indigenous groups. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Kayapo indigenous men stand on a tree log and a tree stump left by loggers who fled when they where doing a surveillance patrol three weeks ago on their land in the Amazon near Novo Progresso, Para state, Brazil September 13, 2019. Some 60% of the forest is located in Brazil, the biggest share of the world's largest rainforest. The Amazon is also home to around 1 million people who are members of 500 indigenous groups. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Indigenous Paulo Marcos Tupxi visits his people\u0027s land to see the results of a wildfire which burned the forest in Manoki land, on the outskirts of Brasnorte, in Mato Grosso state, Brazil, August 28, 2019. Some 2,472.91 square miles (6,404.8 square kilometers) have been despoiled, double the area felled at this point last year and larger than the U.S. state of Delaware.


REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Indigenous Paulo Marcos Tupxi visits his people's land to see the results of a wildfire which burned the forest in Manoki land, on the outskirts of Brasnorte, in Mato Grosso state, Brazil, August 28, 2019. Some 2,472.91 square miles (6,404.8 square kilometers) have been despoiled, double the area felled at this point last year and larger than the U.S. state of Delaware. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A Kayabi indigenous young man climbs a tree to harvest acai on the outskirts of Juara, Mato Grosso state, Brazil September 1, 2019. 

REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A Kayabi indigenous young man climbs a tree to harvest acai on the outskirts of Juara, Mato Grosso state, Brazil September 1, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A firefighter from ABAFA Amazonia operation puts out a fire in a forest in the city of Uniao do Sul, Mato Grosso, Brazil September 4, 2019. 

REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A firefighter from ABAFA Amazonia operation puts out a fire in a forest in the city of Uniao do Sul, Mato Grosso, Brazil September 4, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands inside the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. 

REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Indigenous people from the Mura tribe show a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands inside the Amazon rainforest near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
An Indigenous man from the Mura tribe paints his face in Itaparana village near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. 

REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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An Indigenous man from the Mura tribe paints his face in Itaparana village near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A sign reads \
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A sign reads "Private property, allowed people only, fishing and hunting prohibited" in Manoki demarcated land, which had a wildfire a week earlier, on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 28, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Turu, an Arara indigenous cacique, walks near logs he said were illegally felled at the village of Arado near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Turu, an Arara indigenous cacique, walks near logs he said were illegally felled at the village of Arado near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Manoel Kanunxi, chief of the Manoki indigenous people, points to the location of his people\u0027s land that was burnt, on a map drawn in dirt, on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Manoel Kanunxi, chief of the Manoki indigenous people, points to the location of his people's land that was burnt, on a map drawn in dirt, on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
An aerial view shows the village of Arado, where Arara indigenous people live in, near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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An aerial view shows the village of Arado, where Arara indigenous people live in, near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A Myky indigenous man passes near a wildfire on his way to hunt on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 29, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A Myky indigenous man passes near a wildfire on his way to hunt on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 29, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
An Indigenous named Pedro Mura from the Mura tribe reacts in front of a deforested area in nondemarcated indigenous land, near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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An Indigenous named Pedro Mura from the Mura tribe reacts in front of a deforested area in nondemarcated indigenous land, near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A firefighter from ABAFA Amazonia operation puts out a fire in the city of Uniao do Sul, Mato Grosso, Brazil September 4, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A firefighter from ABAFA Amazonia operation puts out a fire in the city of Uniao do Sul, Mato Grosso, Brazil September 4, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A fire burns a tract of the Amazon jungle in Uniao do Sul, Mato Grosso, Brazil September 4, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A fire burns a tract of the Amazon jungle in Uniao do Sul, Mato Grosso, Brazil September 4, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
An indigenous girl from the Parintintin tribe sits on a cut tree trunk in Traira village near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 16, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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An indigenous girl from the Parintintin tribe sits on a cut tree trunk in Traira village near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 16, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
An indigenous man from the Mura tribe holds a butterfly in Itaparana village near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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An indigenous man from the Mura tribe holds a butterfly in Itaparana village near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
A Kayabi indigenous man is seen in his village with his bow and arrow and fight ornaments, on the outskirts of Juara, Mato Grosso state, Brazil September 1, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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A Kayabi indigenous man is seen in his village with his bow and arrow and fight ornaments, on the outskirts of Juara, Mato Grosso state, Brazil September 1, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Turu, an Arara indigenous cacique, is pictured near logs he said were illegally felled at the village of Arado near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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Turu, an Arara indigenous cacique, is pictured near logs he said were illegally felled at the village of Arado near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Manoki indigenous people walk past a traditional house in Cravari village on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Manoki indigenous people walk past a traditional house in Cravari village on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
An Arara indigenous girl stands beside her hammock at the village of Arado, near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce
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An Arara indigenous girl stands beside her hammock at the village of Arado, near Altamira, Para state, Brazil, September 9, 2019. REUTERS/Nacho Doce

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Kayabi indigenous children practice with bows and arrows in their village on the outskirts of Juara, Mato Grosso state, Brazil September 1, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Kayabi indigenous children practice with bows and arrows in their village on the outskirts of Juara, Mato Grosso state, Brazil September 1, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
An Indigenous named Raimundo Praia Mura from the Mura tribe reacts in front of a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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An Indigenous named Raimundo Praia Mura from the Mura tribe reacts in front of a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe react in front of a deforested in unmarked indigenous lands near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Indigenous people from the Mura tribe react in front of a deforested in unmarked indigenous lands near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Manoki children are seen during a Manoki traditional language class in Cravari indigenous village on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Manoki children are seen during a Manoki traditional language class in Cravari indigenous village on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Manoki indigenous girls are seen during a ritual for jungle and Amazonia, on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli
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Manoki indigenous girls are seen during a ritual for jungle and Amazonia, on the outskirts of Brasnorte, Mato Grosso state, Brazil August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
Indigenous people from the Mura tribe shows a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino
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Indigenous people from the Mura tribe shows a deforested area in unmarked indigenous lands near Humaita, Amazonas State, Brazil August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sep 17, 2019 2:47 AM IST
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